Best Robot Vacuum Cleaner Reviews

While robotic vacuums are a relatively new innovation, the market has matured enough to allow plenty of options to choose from when searching for the best robotic vacuums . This page is meant to showcase the main brands available. At the bottom we have assembled a full comparison table to compare the features of each individual model side by side.

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Roomba 600 Series

While older than the 700 series vacuums, the 600 series presents an affordable choice without sacrificing too much in the way of technology. The 600 series introduced enhanced robotic vacuum suction with iRobot’s new AeroVac technology. The 600 series also featured auto-charging with the unit able to independently navigate back to the charging base. The scheduling options for cleaning and advanced dirt detection are some of the other stronger points of the 600. The main drawbacks are the higher levels of noise and an at times imperfect navigation. While mostly flawless, the 600 series can occassionally get lost. Altogether, the 600 Roomba’s were a big step forward and can be had at a steep discount.

Roomba 700 Series

The 700 series is the latest offering from iRobot. They are a number of models (4 total) at various price ranges for different budgets and needs starting at $450. The first minor improvement was the addition of a touchpad navigation for the 780 and 790 models (the 760 and 770 still have buttons). While automatic scheduling was available for the Roomba 650, it is now standard with all 700 models. New patented “dirt detection sensors” are now standard for the 770, 780, and 790. This feature alone has made the higher 700 models better optimized than the 600 series. Better dirt detection means that the Roomba can determine when and where to focus additional “passes”. This has made the overall product much more efficient. Other enhancements include a new HEPA filter, larger and more efficient dust bins, and remote control options for all models 780 and below. The 790 offers a state-of-the-art “virtual command center” to control your device remotely from a computer. There were a few major upgrades in the 700 series. Altogether, the changes to the 700 series line have made a good product even better.

Roomba 800 Series

The Roomba 800 series is the latest offering from iRobot. As of now, the only model available are the Roomba 880 and the recently released Roomba 870. They boasts substantial improvements over the 700 series, mainly with a new superior suction technology. The AeroForce performance cleaning system picks up close to 50% more dirt and debris than previous models and the batteries last up to 2x as long as the 700 series. The only problem with the new Roomba 870 is that they are quite hard to find. They are available exclusively at the iRobot website.

UPDATE: You can now purchase the Roomba 880 on Amazon at this listing (see price)

Neato Vacuums

Outside of iRobot, Neato has the strongest product offering and longest track record of delivering quality automatic vacuum cleaners. They have had a number of product models over the years, culminating in the recently released Neato XV Signature Pro. One of the first things to notice about the Neato series of vacuums is their flat-front and rounded back. This design is especially tailored for better cornering, allowing the vacuum to thoroughly clean the corners, nooks, and crannies. Another standard enhancement is the industry leading dust bins. Historially, Neato has also invested more in higher powered suction. While this leads to a slightly louder noise volume, Neato vacuums industry leading debris collection. The major difference that most consumers will notice is the lower price when compared to the iRobot models. While they don’t have all the latest bells and whistles like the Roomba’s, even the most expensive Neato XV Signature Pro comes in at around $430 (versus $700 for the top line Roomba model).

Neato Botvac Series

Most recently, Neato has revamped their product line to include a renamed “Botvac” line. They now headline with the Botvac 70e, 75, 80, 85 and D80. You can read my review of the new Botvac 80 (their top line offering) by following this link. Most of the changes were cosmetic and had to do with branding, but there were some nice functional improvements with the hardware/features.

iTouchless Vacuums

iTouchless Vacuums are not nearly as well known or trusted as the Neato or iRobot offerings. iTouchless has been around for over 15 years, designing and marketing a variety of home automation products. Unlike Neato or iRobot, iTouchless is not specifically focused on the home robotics niche. The iTouchless Pro is the only robotic vacuum on the market. It was originally released in 2008 and has not seen major updates since. While the iTouchless Pro gets the job done, it is far from refined. Loud noises and a lack of consistency generally plague this vacuum. Many users have also experienced total system failure after a few months of service. It fares better on tile, but is still not nearly as good as the Scooba or Braava options by iRobot. The main thing to like about iTouchless is the price, coming in much lower than the competition at around $150.

Infinuvo Vacuums

Infinuvo has been steadily releasing robotic vacuum models, keeping up with Neato and iRobot. While the company has been around the block, they have not developed the same high quality reputation as Neato or iRobot. Infinuvo vacuums are a far better budget alternative than the iTouchless series, however. They carry a full line of vacuums with many of the latest innovations. The latest QQ-5 even includes a sonic wall (similar to Roomba’s “virtual wall”) and “return to base” charging. While the Infinuvo vacuums mimick the latest technology, they do not quite compare to the big players (iRobot, Neato, and LG). The main problems seem to be less consistency. For example, Infinuvo vacuums require more baby-sitting and are less “intelligent” than the industry leaders. Similarly, the “sonic wall” technology is not perfect and occassionally suffers from lapses which can lead to problematic results. All together, Infinuvo is one of the best lower cost robotic vacuum brands, coming in at around $200. The technology is not quite there yet, but for many users it will be good enough.

Dirt Devil Vacuums

Dirt Devil has been in the vacuum business for quite some time. While their brand name has changed, the company goes back to the early 1900s. Most of their product offerings have historically been traditional vacuum cleaners, but they have also entered the home robotics market with their Dirt Devil Whiskers (and recently RoomMate) line. Like the other major brands, Dirt Devil provides a couple different price points for customers to choose from. The most expensive vacuums generally top out at $150. One of the first things to note about the Dirt Devil vacuums is that they are primarily geared towards hard floor surfaces. With less functionality, the Dirt Devil already is in a difficult position. Some of the main complaints – like most lower budget robotic vacuums – is that the battery tends to run out after about 6 months. It costs about $50 for a replacement battery. In terms of technology, the vacuums tend to have more limited intelligence. The vacuums tend to spend more time cleaning around the edges of rooms than covering the main surface area. This is likely due to a set timing mechanism that regulates cleaning for average room sizes. This is a definite step down from the higher end brands. While not a bad investment for the money, this company still has a lot to prove in terms of technological chops.

LG Vacuums

LG is the relative new kid on the block. Unlike the many new budget brands and models, LG comes in at the higher end. In many ways, LG is taking on iRobot and the Roomba series directly. While it LG may not have the best roboic vacuum hands down, they certainly come close. The LG HomBot Square is targetted clearly at the high-end Roomba 790, pricing in at a steep $799. LG also offers a more traditional model at $599. Both offerings feature innovative new technology that rivals the leading brands. One of the first things LG owners will notice is the remarkably quite operation of the devices. In fact, it is safe to say that LG has the least “noise pollution” of any robotic vacuum on the market today. LG offers all of the leading features one would expect from a higher end robotic vacuum, including aut0-scheduling, smart floor mapping, and various cleaning “modes” for different floor types and room sizes. While the price tag is higher than most of the competition, LG has proven to be the up and coming competitor to both Neato and iRobot.

iClebo

iClebo is another new competitor that has sprung up recently. Their iClebo YCR-M05-10 Arte is their flagship product and is comparable in many ways to the leading Roomba and Neato models. It’s key selling point is that it is an all-in-one vacuum/mop combo, meaning that it picks up dust and debris, but can also clean and disinfect hard floors. This is a very intriguing feature. iRobot has traditionally sold these two features as stand-alone separate devices. The technology behind this combo with iClebo is not perfect, but it will certainly maintain a clean environment. Just don’t expect the mopping job to be a replacement for traditionally mopping (more like a supplement). As a whole, the iClebo Arte has been relatively well received by customers. It definitely deserves to be a comparable product to many of the Neato and Roomba models, but it is not yet a clear winner in terms of superiority.

Miele

Miele is yet another relatively new competitor in the robotic vacuum space. As a company, they have not traditionally been focused on robotics, but they do have a strong background in vacuum technology and products. Their only offering is the Miele RX1 Scout, a competent – if expensive – robot vacuum. You can read our full review of this vacuum here. Time will tell if they will fully commit to the home robotics market, or if the Scout was just a token “scouting” expedition.

Rotech

Rotech is one of the many lower budget robotic vacuum companies that has sprung up in the wake of the Roomba and Neato’s success. I wouldn’t recommend these brand at this time. As it is, the tend to have supply and quality control issues.

Robot Vacuum Comparison Table

Vacuum ModelBattery LifeWarrantyContainment ToolsAuto-SchedulingPriceOur Reviews
iRobot Roomba 620
60 minutes1 year factory / 6 month batterynonenosee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 630
60 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery1 virtual wallnosee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 650
60 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery1 virtual wallyessee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 760
90 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery2 virtual wallsyessee here for latestNone Yet
iRobot Roomba 770
120 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery2 virtual wallsyessee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 780
120 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery2 virtual lighthousesyessee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 790
120 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery3 virtual lighthousesyessee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 870

roomba 870 vs 880
120 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery2 virtual lighthousesyessee here for latestRead Our Review
iRobot Roomba 880
120 minutes1 year factory / 6 month battery2 virtual lighthouses + remoteyessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato XV-11
60-80 minutes1 year factory6' boundary markeryessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato XV-21
60-80 minutes1 year factory6' boundary markeryessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato Signature Pro
60-90 minutes1 year factory6' boundary markeryessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato Botvac 70e
60-90 minutes1 year factory6' boundary markeryessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato Botvac 75
60-90 minutes1 year factory6' boundary markeryessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato Botvac 80
60-90 minutes1 year factory6' boundary markeryessee here for latestRead Our Review
Neato Botvac 85
60-90 minutes1 year factory6' boundaryyessee here for latestRead Our Review
iTouchless Pro
60-70 minutes1 year factoryno toolsnosee here for latestNone Yet
Infinuvo CleanMate QQ-2 Basic

70 minutes1 year factory / 6 month batteryno toolsnosee here for latestNone Yet
Infinuvo CleanMate QQ-2 Advanced
70 minutes1 year factory / 6 month batteryno toolsnosee here for latestNone Yet
LG HomBot 1.0
75 minutes2 year body, 6 months batteryno toolsyessee here for latestRead Our Review
LG HomBot (Square) 3.0
75 minutes2 year body, 6 months batteryno toolsyessee here for latestRead Our Review
P3 P4690 V-Bot
45 minutes1 year factoryno toolsnosee here for latestNone Yet
Dirt Devil Whiskers SV
50 minutes1 year factoryno toolsnosee here for latestNone Yet
iClebo YCR-M05-10 Arte
160 minutes1 year factoryarea boundary tape + remoteyessee here for latestRead Our Review
Moneual MR6550
90 minutes1 year factoryRoom Indicatornosee here for latestRead Our Review

6 Comments

  • love all these reviews, thank you!
    im trying to compae between the neato 85 and roomba 870.
    i have no carpet, all wood tile or linoleum. two cats, and two long long haired people.
    also a bunch of furniture i would like it to go under but are low.plus power cables.

    any advice would be great.

    • Hi Katy, thanks for the comment! If you are a first time prospective robot owner and price is not an issue, I’d go with the Roomba 870. The Neato 85 and Roomba 870 are very comparable in terms of features, however, iRobot has a better track record of reliability. I love my Neato’s too, but they tend to have more little issues that pop up over extended use. It’s not that you’d be disappointed with the Neato Botvac 85, but I have a higher level of confidence in the Roomba 800 series.

  • Hi!

    Thank you so much for your reviews. I’ve been reading them diligently, but still need a little help deciding. I’ve been struggling between the botvac 85, and then the 650, 770, and 880 Roombas. Our home is mostly hardwood floors with just a few area rugs….one dog and one cat.

    Thank you for any advice you have 🙂

    • Hi Arthur,

      Thanks for commenting. You have basically highlighted the best options with the 85, 650, 770, and 880. In my view, you can’t go wrong with the Roomba 880. Yes it’s more expensive, but you are getting the best technology on the market from the market leader in home robotics. The Botvac 85 is a close runner-up, but i just like the reliability, customer service, and market for replacement parts that Roomba offers. It’s really a toss-up and it comes down to largely inconsequential quibbles about “cleaning patterns” and dust bin sizes.

      Alternatively, if this is your first robotic vacuum, jumping in with the more affordable Roomba 650 might be a nice way to learn how to live with a robotic vacuum. Sometimes it takes living with a robot to know what you want, need, and like in a robot. Living situations and preferences are different, depending on the individual and circumstance. The bottom line is that you can’t go wrong with any of those selections.

      -Patrick

  • These reviews are all fantastic! I have a shag rug in my living room that the vacuum will need to cross to do the other side of my apartment …would any of these be able to handle it? I am considering the Roomba 980, Neato Botvac Connected, and the Samsung VR900 Powerbot. I have 50/50 split of carpet/hardwood floors and a short haired heavy shedding dog. Thanks for the advice!

    • Hey Nick, thanks for the comment. The infamous shag rugs!! From my personal experience, it’s a bit of trial and error for these type of rugs. I would lean more towards the Roomba 980 or Botvac Connected (both are really good). If you can spend the extra dollars, the 980 has “carpet boost” which is a bit better at cleaning carpets than the Botvac. With 50% carpet coverage, it’s definitely a consideration worth thinking about.

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